Art Market News

The_Vitruvian_Rat_by_GreenLabRat

Proof that morphine improves art appreciation!

Recent studies at Keio University in Japan, have seemingly demonstrated that some mice can learn to prefer a Kandinsky over a Mondrian — if the Kandinsky comes with a dose of morphine! (Or milk — whatevs.)

What’s more, given rewards while looking at a particular artist the mice will come to “prefer” works by the same artist when they are newly presented.

Don’t most critics work the same way? (ba-dum-bum!)

Shigeru Watanabe, a psychologist at Keio University published these findings in June in the Public Library of Science.  According to The Economist, Dr. Wantanabe “has previously shown that Java sparrows are able to distinguish cubist paintings from impressionist and Japanese ones, and that pigeons can tell a Chagall from a Van Gogh.”

And an owl stare down Marina Abromovic.

Read more at The Economist

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What’s In It for THEM?

Ever ask yourself why moguls with whopping art collections open them up to the public? Cat Weaver, with GalleryIntell, provided some answers in a two-parter early this month. In sum: altruism, ego, power, and tax benefits.

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How to Collect Art

It’s easy! Just keep six tips in mind!
Learn what you like, Specialize, Plan Ahead, Get Advice, Do Your Homework, and, Keep It Up
Cat Weaver, at GalleryIntell examines how!

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Banksy, Thug for LIfe
Banksy, Thug for LIfe

Just HOW Corrupt is the Art Market?

Answer, not any more corrupt than the stock market, or any other market. According to Hyperallergic’s Mostafa Heddaya, who criticizes “fictions about the exceptional irrationality or corruption of the art market are sustained for various reasons — from marginalized artists who would sooner believe that it is the art market, rather than the market entire, which is predisposed against them to financial journalists who want to legitimize their own lack of scrutiny for “the real economy” by using the art market as a straw man for “inefficient” or “corrupt” markets.”
Read about it on Hyperallergic

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